• Lenape Social Studies Department

    Mr. Lawrence Strittmatter
    Assistant Principal
    Social Studies Supervisor

    Mr. Kevin Meder
    Coordinator

    Social Studies Department Teachers
    Mrs. Jennifer Adams
    Mr. Gerry Boggs
    Ms. Devin Dimmig

    Mrs. Debbie Geissler

    Mrs. Jennifer Guerrera

    Mr. Gregory Harvey

    Mrs. Michelle KaighnMr. Erik KrastekMr. Brian Laddey
    Mr. Kevin MederMrs. Roseann MullinMrs. Jessica Page
    Mr. Joe PorcoMr. David RohrerMr. Allan Tittermary


    Social Studies Courses
    at Lenape High School

    U.S. HISTORY

    U.S. HISTORY I (Honors and Accelerated)
    An in-depth analysis of history of the United States from 1787-1900 which focuses on the social changes, territorial expansion, industrialization, and conflicts over power that helped shape the United States. Honors is offered by invitation only to students earning an A in English I (Accelerated) or B in English I (Honors).

    U.S. HISTORY I (College Prep)
    The content and time period are the same as described in Level 1 & 2. The instructional pace is less rigorous than Level 1 & 2, but is designed to prepare students for two-years colleges, community and vocational schools, as well as the world of work.

    U.S. HISTORY I (Modified)
    As described in Level 2 except that it emphasizes remediation in basic skills and the individual needs of the student.

    U.S. HISTORY I (P.R.)
    Available for students in need of individualized or small group instruction, with Child Study Team approval. This course covers the historical period of discovery up to and including the Civil War era. Additional emphasis is placed on understanding of current events and use of maps and globes. Class discussion, critical thinking and organizational skills are emphasized.

    U.S. HISTORY II (Honors and Accelerated)
    An in-depth analysis of the history of the United States from 1900 to the present, which focuses on the roles of change, conflict, diversity, scarcity, interdependence and authority in shaping and affecting the 20th Century. *Honors also offered at Lenape, Shawnee and Seneca as BCC CAP Course.

    U.S. HISTORY II (College Prep)
    Content and time period as described in levels 1 & 2. The instructional pace is less rigorous than levels 1& 2, but is designed to prepare students for two-year colleges, community and vocational schools, as well as the world of work.

    U.S. HISTORY II (Modified)
    As described in Level 2 except greater emphasis is placed on remediation and individual needs of the student.

    U.S. HISTORY II (P.R.)
    Available for students in need of individualized or small group instruction, with Child Study Team approval. This course covers the historical period of Reconstruction to the present, with an emphasis on international, social and economic developments of our current society. Class discussion, critical thinking, and organizational skills are emphasized.

    WORLD CULTURES

    *WORLD CULTURES (Honors and Accelerated)
    A study of the geography, history and philosophies, governments, arts, economics, and social systems of the major cultural areas. Students will be able to identify and locate the political divisions and describe the physical characteristics including climate and landforms for each of the cultural regions. Students will acquire a historical understanding of each cultural region including political, economic, and religious events that shaped the region with an emphasis on understanding their impact on present global situations. Students will be able to describe, compare, and analyze the elements of culture, and recognize that these elements are interrelated. Cultural regions studied are Latin America, Sub- Saharan Africa, North Africa and the Middle East, Europe and Russia, South Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia and the Pacific. *Level 1 also is offered at Cherokee, Shawnee and Seneca as a BCC CAP Course.

    WORLD CULTURES (College Prep)
    Content and time period as described in levels 1 & 2. The instructional pace is less rigorous than levels 1 & 2, but is designed to prepare students for two-year colleges, community and vocational schools, as well as the world of work.

    WORLD CULTURES (Modified)
    As in Level 2 with emphasis on remediation in the basic skills.

    WORLD CULTURES (P.R.)
    Available for students in need of individualized or small group instruction, with Child Study Team approval. Course content provides students with an overview of the physical, social and economic qualities of various geographical regions of the earth. Additional emphasis is placed on map reading and current events. Class discussion, critical thinking, and organizational skills are emphasized.

    SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES

    HUMANITIES SEMINAR (Accelerated)
    In this age of specialization and almost limitless access to knowledge, it is crucial for students to develop the ability to evaluate the relationships between ideas, assimilate new points of view and recognize how specific disciplines lead to specific conclusions. Equally important is the need to have a strong intellectual foundation in a number of disciplines. It is not enough to access information; one must develop the skills necessary to make responsible decisions and take appropriate actions based on that information. This course is designed to teach students to develop their ability to see art, listen to music and read literature. In addition to developing criteria for aesthetic judgment, the course emphasizes evaluation of the historic, social and philosophical significance of ideas, institutions and works of human expression. The course will demonstrate the evolution of crucial themes and ideas and relate them to current issues and attitudes. Students will develop skills necessary for communication ideas to others. Humanities Seminar is a Level II academic elective without prerequisite. It will be team-taught by a teacher from the English Department and a teacher from the Humanities Department.

    *MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY (Honors)
    Advanced Placement The study of European history since 1450 introduces students to cultural, economic, political and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world today. Offered to those students who display special abilities in Social Studies. Equivalent to a first year college course. These students will be able to take the College Board’s Advanced Placement Test and could receive college credit or advanced standing depending upon their scores and the policy of the college. Summer readings are required in this class. *Also offered at Cherokee and Lenape as BCC CAP Course.

    *PSYCHOLOGY (Honors)
    Advanced Placement Honors level psychology course, currently offered via ITV or in the individual schools, covers the general areas of the E.T.S. A.P. psychology course and will allow students to take the A.P. test if they so choose. A strong background in biological sciences is recommended. Prerequisite: an “A” or “B” in an advanced placement class or an “A” in behavioral science with the recommendation of the behavioral science teacher. *Also offered at Lenape, Shawnee and Cherokee as BCC CAP Course. Beginning in the school year 2005- 2006, prerequisites for AP Psychology will be an A in Behavioral Science and an A in U.S. History II – Level 1.

    AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (Accelerated)
    Designed to enhance knowledge of American government. To achieve this goal, the following topics will be covered: political heritage, the growth and operation of the federal government, the Supreme Court and individual rights, the function of state and local governments, and the voters’ role in political campaigns.

    CIVICS (Modified)
    Concentrates on the study of law, its effects on the individual, the family, groups, and government. The course emphasizes the rights and responsibilities of citizenship.

    CURRENT AFFAIRS (College Prep)
    A study of present day national and international events which can affect our lives. The course seeks to develop an understanding of changing world conditions: social, political, and economic.

    ECONOMICS (Accelerated)
    A survey course that seeks to balance economic theory with the practical application of economic ideas. The course is designed to cover such topics as the characteristics of the American economy, investing in the stock market, preparing income tax returns, money and banking, global trade, personal economics, labor issues and the role of the American corporation.

    FOUNDATIONS OF LEADERSHIP (Accelerated)
    The course introduces the fundamental principles of leadership with an emphasis on the application of the principles of self-development and organizational effectiveness. Students will learn more about themselves through participation in a number of class activities, including class discussions, experiential challenge activities, seminars, and group work. This course will contain a strong emphasis on the development of effective communication skills.

    HUMAN BEHAVIOR (College Prep)
    Human Behavior is designed to provide the non-college preparatory student with a practical and fundamental approach to the study of psychology and aspects of sociology. Human Behavior emphasizes personality development and selfactualization through values clarification and academic pursuits.

    HUMAN BEHAVIOR (P.R.)
    Designed to give at-risk secondary students the skills needed for them to experience greater success both in school and in life. Emphasis is on helping students build self-esteem through building a positive self-image, learning to accept responsibility for their actions as well as non-actions, to communicate effectively with others, and to enhance their living skills.

    MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY (Accelerated)
    A survey course of European history from the French Revolution to the present. Emphasis is on the birth and growth of movements like nationalism, socialism, communism, revolution, and internationalism.

    SOCIOLOGY (Accelerated)
    This course will examine and analyze how societies, communities, and smaller groups are organized and maintained and, most importantly, how they affect human behavior. Students will examine how societal elements such as class, culture, race, gender, family, medicine, business, technology, education, religion, and government affect their lives. Emphasis will be placed on deepening students’ understanding of both their own experiences and the complexity of social phenomena in contemporary America society.

    WORLD CIVILIZATION (Accelerated)
    A survey course of the foundation of western culture up to the late 18th Century. The course encompasses a study of pre-historic man, ancient civilizations, the civilizations of Greece and Rome, Medieval and Renaissance eras, the Age of Enlightenment and the study of Chinese and Indian Cultures.

    WORLD GEOGRAPHY (Accelerated)
    Centers on the physical characteristics of countries: location, climate, topography, products and resources, population, trade, etc. Skills in map analysis and interpretation of climatic data are featured.

    WORLD GEOGRAPHY (College Prep)
    Centers on the physical characteristics of the countries: location, climate, topography, products and resources, population and trade. Skills in map analysis and interpretation of climatic data are featured. The instructional pace is less rigorous than level 2, but is designed to prepare students for 2-year colleges, community and vocational schools, as well as the world or work.

    STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN HIGH SCHOOL AND LIFE
    Designed primarily as an elective for freshmen, although any student in any grade may take it. Designed to foster appreciation for cultural diversity and individualism as well as to teach study skills at an early stage to be applied throughout high school and higher learning. Taught by English and History departments. Credits will not count toward English or History requirements for graduation.

    UNITED STATES FOREIGN AFFAIRS (Accelerated)
    Traces the development of American foreign policy. It covers significant 20th Century trends and attitudes: the Cold War, U.S./Soviet relations, the U.S. role as political and economic leader in the western world, support of international institutions, and our future role in international affairs, given the end of the Cold War and the rise of new economic and military power centers.

    SEMESTERIZED SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES

    AMERICAN MINORITIES (Accelerated)
    The life styles and attitudes of minority groups in America are compared and contrasted. Attention is given to social issues and the emerging roles of minorities in diverse communities.

    AMERICAN PROFILES (Accelerated)
    Do great people make history or does history make great people? This course studies the lives of outstanding Americans and how they affected the growth of the nation.

    AMERICAN WOMEN: PAST TO PRESENT (Accelerated)
    Explores the fundamental role women have played in helping shape our society. The course will be taught around several main themes which include: equality, social reform, activism and the image of women. Core questions to be discussed are: How are gender roles established? What issues have women faced in the areas of education, politics, society, the workforce and the military? How has the image of women changed as society has changed? Contemporary issues such as violence against women, sexual harassment, eating disorders and the impact of media on women’s self image also will be examined. Biographical sketches of notable American women in government, the media, athletics, entertainment and the arts will be woven throughout the course to give students a more indepth look at these women’s motivations and achievements in our society.

    CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS (Accelerated)
    Addresses the basic rights and freedoms of American citizens. General course content outlines the history and development of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Selected Supreme Court decisions will be analyzed and discussed in a historical perspective.

    MODERN UNITED STATES WARS (Accelerated)
    Examines American involvement in World Wars I and II, Korea, Vietnam, and the Gulf War. The course analyzes and compares factors which influenced U.S. participation and treats the effects of participation on U.S. political, economic, and social institutions