• Lenape Regional High School District

    Latin II, Level 1 Course of Study

    Revised 2009

     

    Table of Contents

     

    Members of Revision Committee

     

    Statement of Purpose

     

    Program of Studies Description

     

    Core Content Standards

     

    Textbook and Resource Materials

     

    Course Objectives/Activities

     

    Content Outline/Timeline

     

     

     

    Members of Revision Committee

     

    Member

     

    School           

    Email 

    Extension

    William Palladino

     

    Seneca High School

    wpalladino@lrhsd.org

    X8374

    Peter Campbell

     

    Shawnee High School

    pcampbell@lrhsd.org

     

    X4431

    Robynn Hecht

     

    Lenape High School

    rhecht@lrhsd.org

    X8726

    Matt Underwood

    Cherokee High School

    munderwood@lrhsd.org

    X8563

     

    Bernadette Katrisiosis

    Seneca High School

    bkatrisiosis@lrhsd.org

    X8026

                                       

     

    Statement of Purpose:

     

                The purpose of all curriculum guides is to provide direction for instruction.  They identify the written outcomes in a subject and /or grade as the basis for classroom activities and student assessment.  In order to achieve maximum understanding, the objectives identified as learning outcomes must be written clearly and reflect the specific learning and behavior which are expected.

     

                Objectives are written as major outcomes and stated to require critical thinking. Teachers should understand that they must make careful decisions about the specific sub skills and prior learning needed to reach these objectives.  These professionals are encouraged to reflect with others teaching the same curriculum for this purpose and also to identify the most appropriate resources and methods of assessment.  The assessments are directly aligned with the objectives.  Therefore, the objectives in this guide are designed to provide direction to the teacher in order to facilitate instructional planning.

     

                All teachers, parents and students should be informed of the expected outcomes (i.e. objectives) for the subject and/or grade level.

     

    Core Content Standards for Classical Languages:

     

    7.1 Classical Languages

     

    The study of classical languages focuses primarily on the interpretive mode using historical contexts. Occasionally, some attention may be given to oral dimensions of classical languages, such as by asking students to make presentations in the language of study as a way of strengthening their language knowledge and use.

     

    Program of Studies Description:

     

    LATIN 2

     

    Level 1

     

    Reviews Latin I and introduces the students to grammar concepts and vocabulary applicable to Latin II. Students will have the opportunity to read Roman authors such as Livy, Julius Caesar, and Plautus and to study the history and culture of the Roman Republic.

     

    Core Content Standards for Latin 2, Level 1:

     

    Intermediate-Low Level

     

    Strand A. Interpretive Mode – Intermediate-Low

     

    Linguistic:

    The Intermediate-Low language learner understands and communicates at the sentence level and can use simple sentences independently to:

    o    Identify the main idea and some supporting details when reading.

    o    Understand the gist and some supporting details of conversations dealing with everyday life.

    o    Infer the meaning of some unfamiliar words when used in familiar contexts.

     

    Cultural

    o    Immigration changes both the community of origin and the new community. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current and past immigration patterns, the impact of immigration on society, and related issues.)

     

    o    The study of another language and culture deepens understanding of where and how people live and why events occur. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, science, economics, and geography.)

     

    o    Due to globalization and advances in technology, the products and practices of a culture change over time, and these changes may impact cultural perspectives. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: science, technology, history, social sciences, the visual and performing arts, and world literature.)

     

    o    Human and animal migration are often related to the availability of resources and the ability to adapt to the environment. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: habitats, animals, weather, science, geography, social sciences, and distribution of resources.)

     

    o    Personal preferences and skills are key factors to consider when making decisions about postsecondary plans. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: personal likes/dislikes, subject-area preferences, academic record, and career awareness, exploration and preparation.)

     

    o    The amount of leisure time available and how it is spent varies among cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: likes/dislikes, pastimes schedules, and travel.)

     

    o    Wellness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: sports and physical fitness activities and common health conditions/problems and remedies.) 

     

    o    Online newspapers, magazines, blogs, wikis, podcasts, videos, and government websites provide current information on perspectives of the target culture on local, national, and global problems/issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)

     

    7.1.IL.A.1

    Identify the main idea and most supporting details contained in culturally authentic materials using electronic information sources related to targeted themes.

    7.1.IL.A.2

    Demonstrate comprehension of oral and written instructions connected to daily activities through appropriate responses.

    7.1.IL.A.3

    Compare and contrast the use of verbal and non-verbal etiquette (i.e., the use of gestures, intonation, and cultural practices) in the target culture(s) and in one’s own culture.

    7.1.IL.A.4

    Use the target language to describe people, places, objects, and daily activities learned about through oral or written descriptions.

    7.1.IL.A.5

    Demonstrate comprehension of conversations and written information on a variety of topics.      

    7.1.IL.A.6

    Identify the main idea, theme, and most supporting details in readings from age- and level-appropriate, culturally authentic materials.

    7.1.IL.A.7

    Infer the meaning of a few unfamiliar words in some new contexts.

    7.1.IL.A.8

    Compare and contrast unique linguistic elements in English and the target language. 

     

    Strand B – Interpretive Mode – Intermediate-Low

     

    Linguistic:

    The Intermediate-Low language learner understands and communicates at the sentence level and can use simple sentences independently to:

    o    Ask and answer questions related to everyday life.

    o    Handle simple transactions related to everyday life:

     - Initiate, maintain, and end a conversation.

    -  Ask for and give permission.

    -  Express needs.

    -  Give reasons.

    -  Request, suggest, and make arrangements.

    -  Extend, accept, and decline an invitation.

    -  Express an opinion and preference.

     

    Cultural

    o    Immigration changes both the community of origin and the new community. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to:  current and past immigration patterns, the impact of immigration on society, and related issues.)

     

    o    The study of another language and culture deepens understanding of where and how people live and why events occur. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, science, economics, and geography.)

     

    o    Due to globalization and advances in technology, the products and practices of a culture change over time, and these changes may impact cultural perspectives. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: science, technology, history, social sciences, the visual and performing arts, and world literature.)   

     

    o    Human and animal migration are often related to the availability of resources and the ability to adapt to the environment. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to:  habitats, animals, weather, science, geography, social sciences, and distribution of resources.)

     

    o    Personal preferences and skills are key factors to consider when making decisions about post-secondary plans. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: personal likes/dislikes, subject-area preferences, academic record, and career awareness, exploration, and preparation.)

     

    o    The amount of leisure time available and how it is spent varies among cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to:  likes/dislikes, pastimes, schedules, and travel.)

     

    o    Wellness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: sports and physical fitness activities and common health conditions/problems and remedies.)

     

    o    Online newspapers, magazines, blogs, wikis, podcasts, videos, and government sites provide current information on perspectives of the target culture on local, national, and global problems/issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to:  current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)

     

    o    Current trends and issues influence popular culture. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to:  fashion, style, popular music, art, and pastimes.)

     

     

    7.1.IL.B.1

    Use digital tools to participate in short conversations and to exchange information related to targeted themes.

    7.1.IL.B.2

    Give and follow a series of oral and written directions, commands, and requests for participating in age- and level-appropriate classroom and cultural activities.

    7.1.IL.B.3

    Use appropriate gestures, intonation, and common idiomatic expressions of the target culture(s)/language in familiar situations.

    7.1.IL.B.4

    Ask and respond to factual and interpretive questions of a personal nature or on school-related topics.

    7.1.IL.B.5

    Engage in short conversations about personal experiences or events and/or topics studied in other content areas. 

     

    Strand C – Interpretive Mode – Intermediate-Low

     

    Linguistic:

    The Intermediate-Low language learner understands and communicates at the sentence level and can use simple sentences independently to:

    o    Handle simple transactions related to everyday life

    -  Express needs.

    -  Give reasons.

    -  Express an opinion and preference.

    -  Request and suggest.

     

    Cultural

    o    Immigration changes both the community of origin and the new community. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current and past immigration patterns, the impact of immigration on society, and related issues.)

     

    o    The study of another language and culture deepens understanding of where and how people live and why events occur. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: history, science, economics, and geography.)

     

    o    Due to globalization and advances in technology, the products and practices of a culture change over time, and these changes may impact cultural perspectives. (Content areas that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: science, technology, history, social sciences, the visual and performing arts, and world literature.)

     

    o    Human and animal migration are often related to the availability of resources and the ability to adapt to the environment. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: habitats, animals, weather, science, geography, social sciences, and distribution of resources.)

     

    o    Personal preferences and skills are key factors to consider when making decisions about post-secondary plans. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: personal likes/dislikes, subject-area preferences, academic record, and career awareness, exploration, and preparation.) 

     

    o    The amount of leisure time available and how it is spent varies among cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: likes/dislikes, pastimes, schedules, and travel.)

     

    o    Wellness practices may vary across cultures. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: sports and physical fitness activities and common health conditions/problems and remedies.) 

     

    o    Online newspapers, magazines, blogs, wikis, podcasts, videos, and government websites provide current information on perspectives of the target culture on local, national, and global problems/issues. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: current events and contemporary and emerging global issues, problems, and challenges [e.g., population growth and migration; environmental degradation and protection; discrimination and other conflicts; and the allocation of scarce resources].)

     

    7.1.IL.C.1

    Use knowledge about cultural products and cultural practices to create a multimedia-rich presentation on targeted themes to be shared virtually with a target language audience.

    7.1.IL.C.2

    Present student-created and/or authentic short plays, skits, poems, songs, stories, or reports.

    7.1.IL.C.3

    Use language creatively to respond in writing to a variety of oral or visual prompts.

    7.1.IL.C.4

    Compare and contrast age- and level-appropriate culturally authentic materials orally and in writing. 

    7.1.IL.C.5

    Compare and contrast cultural products and cultural practices associated with the target culture(s) and one’s own culture, orally, in writing, or through simulation. 

    7.1.IL.C.6

    Summarize requirements for professions/careers that require proficiency in a language other than English based on exploration of the 16 Career Clusters

     

     

    Current trends and issues influence popular culture. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: fashion, style, popular music, art, and pastimes.)

    Current trends and issues influence popular culture. (Topics that assist in the development of this understanding should include, but are not limited to: fashion, style, popular music, art, and pastimes.)Textbook and Resource Materials

     

     

    Textbook Materials:

     

    ·         Required Grammar Text.  Wheelock’s Latin (6th Edition).  Harpercollins.  ISBN: 0060956410. 

     

    ·        Required Reader.  1. Ecce Romani II (3rd edition).  Prentice Hall, 2005.  ISBN: 0131163809

     

                                              2.  Selections from Caesar’s De Bello Gallico. Longman, 1994. ISBN: 080130976

     

    ·        Classroom set only.  1. The Romans Speak For Themselves.  Book II.  Prentice HallISBN

                                                                   0801302684

           

              2. Ecce Romani, Language Activity Book, IIA and IIB. Prentice Hall. ISBN   

                               0801312116 and 0801312124

     

                                                  3. Nunc Loquamur: Guided Conversations for Latin. Focus Publishing, 2005.

                                                                    ISBN: 1585901869

    ·        Nationa, l Latin Exam

     

    Resource Materials:

     

    ·      Workbook in Latin Two Years.  AMSCO.  ISBN:  0877205566.

     

    ·      Ecce Romani II. Teacher’s Guide. Prentice Hall. ISBN 0026463652

     

    ·      The Romans Speak For Themselves. Teacher's Handbook. Longman. ISBN: 0801302692.

     

    ·      38 Latin Stories.  (5th Edition).  Bolchazy-Carducci.  ISBN: 086516291.

     

    Course Objectives/Activities:

     

    Tip:  Objectives must be aligned to the Core Curriculum Content Standards.  This section must include technology infusion, multiculturalism, reading and writing across the curriculum, critical thinking, HSPA/SAT, and career awareness.

     

    Course Objectives/Activities**

    **Nota Bene: The “Objectives and Activities” have been modeled very closely after the Standards for Classical Language Learning, a joint publication of the American Classical League, the American Philological Society, and the Regional Classical Associations of the United States.  All subdivisions of material (e.g. reading, writing, culture, etc.) are modeled after the national template.  For Additional reference, see Richard LaFleur, Latin for the 21st Century (Prentice Hall, 1998).

     

    I. Communicate in a Classical Language

     

    Objective 1.1  Students read, translate, and interpret Latin. 7.1.IL.A.5, 6, 7, 8

    Activities to meet objective:

    ·      Students read passages of Latin and connect the relationship of subject and verb within a complex Latin of multiple clauses.

    ·      Students demonstrate an understanding of Latin sentence construction by translating the sentence as well as identifying the particular construction used.

    ·      Students interpret Caesar's Gallic Wars and begin to develop an understanding of the structure and techniques of Latin prose.

     

    Assessment:

    • Students will scan a Latin a complex Latin sentence and accurately link subject with its verb.
    • From a given set of identified constructions, the student will correctly name the construction present in a given sentence.
    • Students' translations of Caesar's Gallic Wars will be graded for accuracy in meaning.

     

    Objective 1.2: Students use orally, listen to, and write Latin as part of the language learning process. 7.1.IL.A.5; 7.1.IL.B.2; 7.1.IL.C.2, 3, 4

    Activities to meet objective:

    ·      Students recognize and reproduce the sounds of Latin.

    ·      Students respond verbally in Latin to Latin prompts given by the teacher and other students.

    ·      Students write in Latin, utilizing the vocabulary and narrative techniques they have learned, whether translating a prose text provided by the teacher, or by creating an imaginative piece themselves.

     

    Assessment:

    • Students will demonstrate the ability to reproduce the sounds of Latin accurately with appropriate speed and cadence.
    • Students will write a Latin composition and be assessed on how well they use Latin vocabulary and narrative construction.

     

     

     II. Gain Knowledge and Understanding of Greco-Roman Culture

     

    Objective 2.1:  Students demonstrate an understanding of the perspectives of Greek or Roman culture as revealed in the practices of the Romans. 7.1.IL.A.1, 4, 6; 7.1.IL.C.1, 4, 5

     

    Sample Activities:

    ·        Students demonstrate a specific knowledge of the daily life of the ancient Greeks or Romans in detail.

    ·        Students demonstrate knowledge of some famous Greeks or Romans and of specific facts of history and geography of the ancient world.

    ·        Students demonstrate a knowledge of the daily life and thought of the ancient Greeks or Romans, gained in part from the Latin or Greek texts they read, and apply that knowledge to an understanding of Greek or Roman culture.

    ·        Students demonstrate a knowledge of the people and facts of Greek or Roman history and political life, gained in part from the Latin or Greek texts they read, and relate that knowledge to an understanding of Greek or Roman perspectives.

     

    Sample Assessments:

           ·        Students produce webquests on various historical, cultural and mythological topics (graded according to a rubric).

           ·        Students deliver oral presentations on chosen topics (graded according to a rubric).

     

     

    Objective 2.2: Students demonstrate an understanding of the perspectives of Greek or Roman culture as revealed in the products of the Greeks or Romans. 7.1.IL.A.1, 4, 6; 7.1.IL.C.1, 4, 5

     

    Sample Activities:

           ·        Students identify the principal Greek or Roman deities and heroes by their names, deeds, and spheres of influence.

           ·        Students recognize basic architectural features and art forms of the Greeks or Romans.                                                                                                                                                 

           ·        Students demonstrate a knowledge of architectural styles, art forms, and artifacts of the Greeks or Romans and use them in analyzing Greek or Roman culture.                            

           ·        Students relate their reading of authentic Roman text, primarily those of Julius Caesar, to an understanding of Roman culture and military strategies. 

     

    Sample Assessments:

    ·        Students produce a written report detailing the influence of Greek and Roman institutions on contemporary art and architecture (rubric).

    ·        Students will identify the basic features of Greek and Roman art and architecture from photographs and sketches (quiz).

    ·        Students will identify Greek/Roman deities by their names, associations, symbols, and/or functions (quiz).

     

     

    III. Connect with other disciplines and expand knowledge

     

    Objective 3.1: Students reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines by drawing connections to their study of classical languages. 7.1.IL.B.1; 7.1.IL.C.6

     

    Sample Activities:

    • Students use their knowledge of Latin or Greek in understanding a specialized vocabulary in such fields as government, politics, history and the sciences.
    • Students learn about the technology invented and/or improved upon by the Romans (e.g. the arch, aqueducts) and apply knowledge from other disciplines, such as science and mathematics to understand how they work.
    • Students create a Latin etymology “bird book” in which they record their encounters with uses of Latin language outside the classroom, as well as words in English derived from Latin.
    • Students create a study of plant nomenclature, including its mythological significance and scientific (Latin) name in order to understand how Linnean taxonomy uses Latin, and compare the ancient plant names with the modern scientific names.

     

    Sample Assessments:

    • Students will demonstrate their ability to interpret terminology from other fields (i.e. Law, Medicine, etc.) based on their knowledge of Latin vocabulary.
    • Students will demonstrate, via models and/or reports, the ability to describe the technology of the Romans in modern terms, e.g. the physics of aqueducts.
    • Students will make comparative studies of similar vocabulary across Latin and the Romance languages.
    • Students will use their knowledge of Latin roots to decode complex vocabulary words as preparation for standardized tests such as the HSPA or the SAT reading section.

     

    Objective 3.2: Students expand their knowledge through the reading of Latin and the study of ancient culture.

    7.1.IL.A.1, 6, 7; 7.1.IL.C.4, 5

     

    Sample Activities:

    • Students acquire information about the Greco-Roman world by reading authentic passages of Latin, and/ or passages with a culturally authentic setting.
    • Students recognize plots and themes of Greco-Roman myths in the literature of other cultures.
    • Students are introduced to the intersection of archaeology and language study through, e.g. reading passages from Vetruvius and examining the ruins and recreations of Roman buildings via the internet and other visual and plastic media.
    • Students read excerpts of Latin authors in translation in order to contextualize their knowledge of ancient geography and cultural practices.

     

    Sample Assessments:

    • Students will analyze the cultural content of Latin passages by responding to written questions.
    • Students will produce models/representations of Roman houses, shrines, cities, etc., based upon passages from ancient authors and their study of ruins, monuments and street plans.
    • Students will be tested on their knowledge of mythological and cultural passages in Latin.
    • National Latin Exam formatted tests and quizzes.
    • Certamen contest.

     

    IV. Develop Insight into Native Language and Culture

     

    Objective 4.1 Students recognize and use elements of the Latin language to increase knowledge of their own language. 7.1.IL.A.1, 7, 8; 7.1.IL.C.4, 5

     

     

    Sample Activities:

    ·      Students develop a more extensive knowledge of Latin roots, prefixes, and suffixes by discovering them in English words of Latin origin and words of Latin origin that came into English through the Romance languages.

    ·      Students explore Latin mottoes, phrases and abbreviations used in general English and  specialized  fields; students create their own Latin mottoes and phrases for school, activity groups (e.g. Latin club) and/or slogans for mock Roman elections, etc.

    ·      Students read selections of texts in both the original Latin and in several English translations in order to compare and contrast the syntax (patterns of sentence structure) in the two languages.

    ·      Students explore etymologies of English words and are able to apply principles of word building and word transfer.

     

    Sample Assessments:

    ·      Students create posters of “word trees” demonstrating the derivation and relationship of English words from Latin.

    ·      Through guided exercises and free-writing on cultural topics, students  engage in word building and are encouraged to employ terms and other vocabulary acquired from their study of Latin word origins.

    ·      Students explore websites for contemporary Latin (e.g. www.grexlat.com , http://www.radiobremen.de/nachrichten/latein/, http://www.yleradio1.fi/nuntii/, etc.) in order to study the formation of new words in Latin and to analyze their relationship to these terms in English. 

     

     

    Objective 4.2: Students compare and contrast their own culture with that of the Greco-Roman world. 7.1.IL.C.4, 5

     

    Sample Activities:

    ·      Via field trips, students compare and contrast the architectural features of the buildings around them and recognize the Greco-Roman elements in them.

    ·      Students compare and contrast aspects of their own public and private lives to those of the Romans.

    ·      Students compare the content, practices and functions of Roman mythology and religion with that of the myths and religious institutions of contemporary western culture.

    ·      Students identify the elements of classical culture in later western art and literature; students are introduced to the concepts of translation, influence, and subversion of classical culture.

    ·      Students reflect on classical influence on the political institutions, law, and history of their own culture.

     

    Sample Assessments:

    ·      Students will compare and contrast their own cultural institutions to those of the ancient Greeks and Romans e.g.  the structure and function of the Roman senate with that of the US senate.

    ·      Students read selections from Vetruvius in Romans Speak for Themselves and compare the structure of Roman houses to their own houses, considering what the differences might tell them about the differences (and similarities) between Roman social arrangements and our own.

    ·      Students create a poster and narrative examining the idea and image of the hero in classical mythology compared to the hero in, e.g. contemporary popular culture and/or as interpreted by  later artists, writers, filmmakers.


    V.    Participate in wider communities of Language and Culture.

     

    Objective 5.1: Students use their knowledge of Latin in a multilingual world. 7.1.IL.A.1; 7.1.IL.B.3

     

    Sample Activities:

    • Students study the seminal influence of Latin in the vocabulary of French, Spanish, and Italian.
    • Latin students meet with students of Romance Languages and discuss with them the etymology of a particular word or cognate group.
    • Students will use media sources, electronic or print, to discover and present examples of Latin forms in the world of advertising and the media.

     

    Sample Assessments:

    • Latin students will be given a Spanish or Italian magazine and present the results of a word search that they recognize based on their knowledge of Latin forms and vocabulary.
    • Students will be given a number of words from Romance languages which clearly derive from known Latin words, and be required to explain their meaning.
    • Students watch and listen to a short television program, e.g. Spanish news (selected for suitability), to recognize the sound and meaning of words.

     

     

     

    Objective 5.2:  Students will use their knowledge of Greco-Roman and ancient culture in a world of diverse cultures. 7.1.IL.A.1; 7.1.IL.B.3

     

    Sample Activities:

    • From their study of Greco-Roman culture students recognize that cultural diversity has been an integral feature of sophisticated societies from ancient times.
    • Students of Latin will confer with other world language clubs and discuss ancient practices such as religion, architecture, travel, and relate this to practices evident in more modern cultures.
    • Students will research a specific cultural practice present in the Greco-Roman world, e.g. slavery, and evaluate its relevance to practices in the modern world.

     

     

    Sample Assessments:

    • Students will select an ancient city, e.g. Ostia Antica, and present an account of the diversity of cultures that existed within that city.
    • Students will compare and contrast the architecture of the classical Roman Villa to the Spanish Hacienda, or the pyramids of Egypt to those of Yucatan.
    • Students will provide evidence comparing types of Roman wedding ceremony to those of other cultures.

     

     

    VI.  Technology Infusion

     

    Objective 6: The student will utilize technology to create a variety of multi-media presentations. 7.1.IL.A.1; 7.1.IL.B.1; 7.1.IL.C.1

     

    Sample Activities:

    •  Students will create a Power Point presentation illustrating thematic advanced vocabulary or detailed culture of a particular unit.
    • Students will create a pamphlet or brochure outlining career opportunities for those who have studied a classical language.
    • Students will create a CD or DVD using digital photography incorporating Roman art and architecture.
    • Students will use photo editing software to create a collage of a specific Roman myth, utilizing various art works on the specified topic. 

     

    Sample Assessments:

    ·      The student will produce a multi-media presentation, pamphlet, or brochure (rubric).

    ·      The students will create a historical web-quest.

    Content Outline/Timeline

     

    1. Weeks Allotted – 1st quarter

     

    History Topics                                                                                                                                                         

    1. Civil Struggle and Reform, Later Republic: The Grachii, Marius and Sulla, Pompey the Great                                                                      
    2. The Collapse of the Republic: Triumvirates and the Battle of Actium                                  
     
    Culture Topics

    1.    Roman Domestic Life: Townhouses and Apartments, The Market Place, Food and Drink, Roman Banquets            

          and Drinking Parties, The Patron/Client System

     

    Myth Topics

          1.   The Underworld: Ceres, Proserpina, and Pluto; Orpheus and Eurydice; Punishments; Geography

     

    Grammar:

    1.     Review of Nouns Declensions.

    2.     Review of uses of all cases. 

    3.     Review of Verb Conjugations.

    1. Passive Voice, all tenses.
    2. Participles: Present, Perfect and Future Tenses; Ablative Absolutes.

    6.   Accusative of Duration and Extent, Ablative of Time When and Place Where.

     

    2.  Weeks Allotted – 2nd quarter

     

    History Topics                                                                                                                                            

          3. The Reign of Augustus

     
    Culture Topics

          2. Aspects of Civil Life: Crime, Piracy, Letters, Dates, Education, Textiles.

     

    Myth Topics

    2.  Heroes: Odysseus, Jason and Medea, Perseus and the Medusa, Theseus and the Minotaur, Bellerophon.

     

    Grammar:

    1. All infinitive forms, active and passive.
    2. Indirect Statement with Accusative Subjects.
    3. Comparison of Adjectives, Declension of Comparatives, Irregular Comparison of Adjectives.
    4. Ablative of Comparison, Use of quam as than, Quam + Superlative.
    5. Comparison of Adverbs, Regular and Irregular.
    6. Quam + Superlative Adverb.
    7. Present Subjunctive, Active and Passive as used in the Jussive and Hortatory Subjunctive.
    8. Present Subjunctive as used in the Purpose Clauses.

     

    3.  Weeks Allotted – 3rd quarter

     

    History Topics                                                        

    1. The Early Empire: The Julio-Claudians
     
    Culture Topics
    1. Roman Entertainment: Graffiti, Children’s Games, Circuses, Gladiators
    2. The Frontiers of the Empire

     

    Myth Topics

           3. Transformation Myths (Ovid)

     

    Grammar:

    1. Summary of Irregular Verbs: fero, eo, volo, nolo
    2. Deponents and Semi Deponents Verbs
    3. Locative Forms
    4. Imperfect Subjunctive, Active and Passive
    5. Result Clauses
    6. Perfect and Pluperfect Subjunctive, Active and Passive
    7. Indirect Question
    8. Cum Clauses

     

     4.  Week Allotted – 4th quarter

     

    History Topics                                                                                                                    

    1. Multiculturalism in Ancient Rome

    6.   Caesar’s Gallic Wars

     

    Culture Topics
         5. Roman Ceremonies: Coming of Age, Religion, Weddings, and Funerals                                                              

     

     

    Myth Topics

          4. Expansion of Mytho-Historical Legends: Alba Longa, the early kings, the Etruscans.

     

    Grammar:

    23. Expanded use of the Relative Pronoun

    24. Conditional Clauses

    25. Indirect Command

    26. Uses of the Gerund and Gerundive

    1. Clauses of Fearing
    2. Impersonal Verbs